Tuesday, April 14, 2009

PowerPoint Slide Makeover - Showing Proportion Using a Diagram

Just a quick note to let you know that a new Slide Makeover Video Podcast based on the ideas in "The Visual Slide Revolution" is available for your viewing through the iTunes Store, online or through my YouTube channel. When we present a proportion or share statistic, I would usually suggest using a pie chart. This makeover shows how a diagram with universal symbols can sometimes be more powerful than a pie chart in helping the audience understand the message.

This slide was submitted by a subscriber to the newsletter- someone just like you who is looking for a way to make their presentations more effective. If you want to submit some of your slides to be considered for a future slide makeover, e-mail them to me at Dave@ThinkOutsideTheSlide.com.

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3 Comments:

Blogger Ole said...

Very neat idea :)

Ttake care about red and green, though. Yes, they're universally understood - but you may loose somewhere around 10% of the audience who can't tell them apart due to colour blindness.

Learned the hard way - my boss can't see the difference...

7:55 AM  
Blogger Dave Paradi said...

I agree about the red and green issue. That's why I included the universal symbols that don't depend on color as an alternative. The audience makeup will help determine if red and green will be a potential issue. The 10% statistic applies to caucasian males only, among other audience members it is well below 1%.

8:18 AM  
Blogger Richard I. Garber said...

Dave:

I call the red-green graphics problem “Christmas Camouflage”. One solution is to use a tool called Vischeck to see your colors they way a color blind person would, as discussed in one of my blog posts:
http://joyfulpublicspeaking.blogspot.com/2009/03/example-of-christmas-camouflage.html

Richard

10:10 AM  

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